Monday, 26 November 2007

5% of children show ADHD behaviour


The latest figures suggest that around five percent of school children
in the UK show ADHD behaviour.
The terms ADD and ADHD are medical diagnoses and describe a syndrome of emotional or behavioural difficulties, which may include extreme impulsiveness, inattentiveness and continuous motor activity. Key characteristics that pupils with ADD or ADHD display are:
  • display impulsivity in all areas of school life
  • murmur, talk or call out continuously because they are unable to internalise speech
  • get up and wander around
  • lash out physically or verbally with no thought for the consequences
  • be easily distracted and therefore find it hard to focus on one activity
  • avoid tasks that require sustained attention
  • often move from one incomplete activity to another
  • find it hard to make and keep friends
  • find it hard to follow instructions
  • often make mistakes because of an inability to attend to detail
  • have poor organisational and self-help skills eg. getting dressed, finding tools for a task
  • forget daily routines
  • be unable to concentrate during tasks involving turn-taking
  • be unaware of danger when running and climbing
  • have constant fidgety movement of hands and feet
  • have difficulty in waiting and allowing others to take turns in a game.

Finding strategies that will effectively support pupils with ADD and ADHD can be a challenge. These disorders will not go away, and their effects can't be eliminated. However, the problems that come with the territory of ADHD can be greatly reduced. ADHD is treatable and can be managed.

RASing Feelings

Feelings, like our bodies, need exercise. ADHD children seem to get frustrated and discouraged often. If taught to handle feelings well, feelings lose their power or hold over us. Teach children three steps to handling feelings. We call it 'RAS.'

R means Recognise Your Feelings.

Recognise means to know or to think about one's feelings. People have two types of feelings. Here are some examples of each type.

Pleasant Feelings
(Feelings we like to have)

happy
excited
surprised
warm
delighted
friendly
relaxed
included

peaceful
joyful
hopeful
proud
love
confident
content
respected

Unpleasant Feelings
(Feelings we don't like to have)

sad
mad
upset
frustrated
disappointed
left out
guilty
jealous

unhappy
worried
tired
stupid
nervous
scared
embarrassed
hurt

Recognising or knowing what feelings a person has is very important. Throughout each day, teach children to stop for a minute and listen to their feelings. They can ask, 'How am I feeling right now?' Their bodies and minds will tell them.

A means Accept Your Feelings

Accept means that feelings are always O.K. Accept means to take feelings as they are. There is nothing wrong with feeling a certain way. Feelings are a part of being human being, and they are O.K.

S means Share Your Feelings

Feelings are to be shared with others. Talking to people we trust about our feelings is a wonderful thing to do. Feelings are not to be kept inside. We just feel better when we talk to others about our feelings.

For more information please visit the websites below:

http://www.sen-for-schools.co.uk/

http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/adhd/complete-publication.shtml

http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/